A critical analysis of dover beach by matthew arnold

Time has not been overly kind to Matthew Arnold either: Note the changes in lines 6, 9, 18, 24, 29, The speaker realises that, out there in the world, there is "neither joy, nor love, nor light…".

The overall feel of the poem should be romantic but its crushed by the depressing images of dismal thing out weight the messages of love transpiring for his wife. This poem condemns the loss of faith, religion and the meaning of life resulting from the industrialization and advancement in science and technology.

Many claim it to be a honeymoon poem and that is understandable because romantic love, albeit of a Victorian nature, features strongly. The world seemed to be strangely unreal, without anything real to cling to on grasp. In fact, those public values are privatised in the very word the poem conjures for us: Arnold calls upon his newlywed wife to show solidarity and fidelity: These images, emphasizing the condition after faith has left, present a void, an emptiness, almost creating a shudder in the reader; it is perhaps a more horrifying image than even the battlefield image with which the poem closes.

There is varied line length, 37 in total, split into 4 stanzas, the first of which is a mixed up sonnet with a rhyme scheme abacebecdfcgfg, a sure signal of a break with convention. Arnold, on the other hand, seems to suggest that the lovers' vow is the only value left with which to counter history.

Matthew Arnold - Summary and Critical Analysis In Dover Beach Matthew Arnold is describing the slow and solemn rumbling sound made by the sea waves as they swing backward and forward on the pebbly shore. The poem overall will become one of many favorite poems and that saying something because poetry is not really on of my cup of teas.

It has variety, beauty and freshness. The withdrawing waves roll the pebbles back towards the sea, and then after a pause, the returning waves roll them up the shore.

Critical Analysis of Dover Beach

Therefore he compares men struggling in the world with armies struggling on a plain at night. The two descriptive analogies are drawn from classical sources, but the unifying sentiment is romantic in its haunting pessimism and lack of faith.

In his Antigone, Sophocles expressed this thought. Now Arnold hears the sound of this Dover Beach, and he finds in it the same thought. The first fourteen lines may well also suggest a sonnet, since this gives certain appearances that it is a love poem.

The second dominant image in the poem is in lines 25 through 28, expressing the emotional impact of the loss of faith. Why should we despair, if the retreating Sea of Faith will, like the tides, come back again in time? Graham Turner Dover Beach is a 'honeymoon' poem.

Poem of the week: Dover Beach

Perhaps this is to over-analyse the poem; perhaps it is to mistake Matthew Arnold himself for his speaker, standing at the window, gazing out at Dover beach. Arnold through 'Dover Beach' describes the effects of industrialization of the 19th century England.

The deceptive calm of the opening lines is undercut by the grating surf on the beach. When I found this out it changed the perspective in which I read it. Come to the window, sweet is the night-air!

Victorian world was changing very rapidly with the growth of science and technology. As in lines for example. The individual words add up—melancholy, withdrawing, retreating, vast, drear, naked—re-creating the melancholy sound of the sea withdrawing, leaving behind only a barren and rocky shore, dreary and empty.

The deliberately plain opening, a common poetic practice in Arnold, emphasizes nouns and verbs and their emotional impact. The world seemed to be strangely unreal, without anything real to cling to on grasp. Arnold's description of the noise of the waves is superbly accurate.

When everything is going perfectly, something unfortunate may happen at any given time, with no forewarning. It is a chilly prospect, like the breath of the night wind, and it brings into the mind a dreary feeling of helplessness, as though the mind is left stripped and bare on the vast and dreary edges of an unknown land.

Matthew Arnold’s Dover Beach: Summary & Analysis

Arnold describes the slow and solemn rumbling sound made by the sea waves as they swing backward and forward on the pebbly shore. There is a sound of confused alarms and struggles, but the soldiers are ignorant as to what they are fighting for and why. There is perhaps not very clear connection between the earlier and the latter part.

The type of poem is said to be free verse.

Dover Beach

The individual words add up—melancholy, withdrawing, retreating, vast, drear, naked—re-creating the melancholy sound of the sea withdrawing, leaving behind only a barren and rocky shore, dreary and empty.Dec 08,  · Critical Analysis of Dover Beach.

The critical analysis of the poem entitled “Dover Beach” by Matthew Arnold. When I first read the poem I got the feeling of gloom, uncertainty and reflective, towards the end of the poem I got a sense of deep melancholy. Dover Beach: Matthew Arnold - Summary and Critical Analysis In Dover Beach Matthew Arnold is describing the slow and solemn rumbling sound made by the sea waves as they swing backward and forward on the pebbly shore.

Arnold took a lecture tour in the United States in the late 19th centu Steaminess Rating The scene is a little romantic, what with its depicting a couple together in a room on a moonlit night. Matthew Arnold’s Dover Beach: Summary This is a poem about a sea and a beach that is truly beautiful, but holds much deeper meaning than what meets the eye.

The poem is written in free verse with no particular meter or rhyme scheme, although some of the words do rhyme. Mar 23,  · Hello Everyone and Welcome to this Critical Analysis ofDover Beach Analysis by Matthew Arnold, Presented to you by Beaming Notes.

Voice-Over and Narration: Anushree Sen.

Dover Beach: Matthew Arnold - Summary and Critical Analysis

“Dover Beach” by Matthew Arnold is dramatic monologue lamenting the loss of true Christian faith in England during the mid ’s as science captured the minds of the public. The poet’s speaker, considered to be Matthew Arnold himself, begins by describing a .

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A critical analysis of dover beach by matthew arnold
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